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Wednesday, 2 September 2015

Helen was a slut, Paris was an MCSF and Troy fell because it protected them. The West is Troy.

Helen and Menelaus: Menelaus intends to strike Helen; captivated by her beauty, he drops his sword. A flying Eros and Aphrodite (on the left) watch the scene. Detail of an Attic red-figure krater, c. 450–440 BC (Paris, Louvre)


Men who have sex with sluts are called MCSFs, expalined at
http://thebattlefieldoflove.blogspot.co.uk/2013/06/all-spossms-are-mcsfs-but-not-all-mcsfs.html

HECABE :

My son was handsome beyond all other men, when you saw him your became the goddess. All the indiscretions of mortals pass for Aphrodite and it is appropriate that the goddess's name begins with folly. You saw him resplendent in his foreign costume and you went out of your mind. For, living in modest circumstances as you were in Greece, you hoped that, once you had shaken off the dust of Sparta, you would enjoy a riot of extravagance in the city of the Phrygians that flowed with gold. Menelaus' palace gave little scope for the life of luxury you wanted to revel in.

So much for that idea. Force was used by my son, you say, when he took you away. Why then was this not noticed by any of the Spartans? Did you scream for assistance from Castor or his brother? They were still there, young and strong, as yet not raised to the stars. When you came to Troy, with the Greeks hot on your trail, and the deadly clash of spears began, any news of Menelaus' success you greeted with, 'My brave Menalaus, hoping to vex my son with the thought he had a powerful rival for your love. But if ever Fortune favoured the Trojans, Menalaus was forgotten. You kept an eye on chance and and studied how to follow in her footsteps, but virtue held no such attractions for you.

Then you describe how you were so reluctant to stay that you used a rope to lower yourself in secret from the battlements. Were you discovered anywhere tying a noose to your neck or sharpening a sword, the course of action a woman of honour would have taken if she yearned for the husband she once had? And yet how often I urged you to act: 'Leave here, my daughter! My sons will find new brides; I will smuggle you out safely to the ships of the Greeks. Bring this fighting between the Greeks and ourselves to an end! But this was not at all to your taste. You were playing the great lady in the house of Alexandros and wanted foreign servants to bow low before you. This was what mattered to you.

And after all this you come out here, you abominable creature, tricked out in these fine clothes, and look your husband in the eye, under the same sky! You should have come out humbly in tattered clothes, quaking with fear, your head shaven, with a modest bearing rather than a shameless air, in view of your past crimes.

Menelaus, so that you know how I mean to end my speech, crown Greece as your good name requires by killing this woman and establishing this law for the rest of womankind: the penalty for betraying one's husband is death.  

[The Koran is rather kinder to adulteresses at 24:2 http://quran.com/24/2]


CHORUS-LEADER

Menelaus, punish your wife as your forefathers and house would approve. Show yourself noble in your enemies' eyes and prevent your fellow-Greeks from charging you with unmanliness.


MENELAUS:

We have arrived at the same conclusion, you and I, that this woman of her own choice left my house to share a stranger's bed.  [To HELEN:] Off with you  now to the place of stoning! I want you to die and pay in an instant for the years of suffering endured by the Greeks; I want you to learn not to bring disgrace upon me! 


HELEN [throwing herself in front of him and clasping at his knees]:

No, I beg you, do not make me guilty of the madness of the goddesses and kill me! Show me some understanding! 


HECABE:

Do not betray the men she killed, your comrades-in-arms! I entreat you in their name, in their children's name!


MENELAUS:

Enough, old woman. I pay her no attention. [To his servants:] Away with her, take her off to the shop that will carry her over the sea!


HECABE:

Do not let her board the same ship as you!


MENELAUS:

Why ever not? Does she weigh more than she used to?


HECABE:

There is no lover who does not love for ever.  


MENELAUS:

That depends on how lovers view matters. But I will do as you wish: she will afford a different ship from mine; for there is actually sense in what you say. And once she gets to Argos she will meet a foul end as befits so foul a creature and make all women curb their lustful instincts. This is no easy task, but just the same her execution will strike fear into their wanton hearts, even if their shamelessness exceeds hers. 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helen_of_Troy suggests the slut got away with it. I propose that a prize be awarded to a modern playwright who produces the best play about how things were between Menelaus and Helen after their return to Sparta from Troy, called The Euripides Prize of Modern Greek Tragedy.

History only repeats itself for our benefit because we refuse to learn its lessons.

3 comments:

MS said...

From what chapter in the Iliad is this?

NM said...

69 I think.

Claire Khaw said...

Verse 987 of Trojan Women by Euripides, actually.